Why is AnxiClear™ So Effective?

Doctor Formulation

AnxiClear™ is a breakthrough proprietary supplement that effectively combines the most powerful and extensively researched ingredients, giving you an all-in-one solution to get rid of anxiety. Every single ingredient in AnxiClear™ was hand-picked by a team of medical doctors and scientific researchers, based on clinical data and designed to help relieve anxiety and stress, getting results more effectively than any other anxiety supplement available.

AnxiClear™ contains seperate day/night time formulas, containing clinically tested ingredients that meet the strength and purity standards of the USP/NF (United States Pharmacopeia–National Formulary). Each ingredient was carefully researched and included based on clinical data. No other non-prescription solution comes close in terms of quality and purity of ingredients.

Recommended dose: Day Formula: For adults, as a dietary supplement, take 2 (two) capsules daily with meals. For optimal use take 1 (one) in the morning before breakfast and 1 (one) in the afternoon with an 8oz glass of water. Nighttime Formula: Adults, take 1 (one) at night before bed, daily, use as a dietary supplement.

AnxiClear's™ Day Formula - Proprietary Blend of Ingredients:

Click here to see our label.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) extract is a safe and effective natural sedative, that calms both the mind and body due to its anxiolytic properties. Clinical research demonstrates that Valerian effectively relieves anxiety-related insomnia and suggests that it may actually be comparable to some prescription anti-anxiety drugs for treating anxiety disorders. Unlike many drugs, however, Valerian is not addictive or habit-forming when taken in the recommended dose and has no known side effects. It is believed to work to have an affect on the brain's GABA system (a major inhibitory neurotransmitter), boosting GABA levels to promote relaxation and lower stress levels.

*References:
  1. Bourin M, Bougerol T, Guitton B, Broutin E. A combination of plant extracts in the treatment of outpatients with adjustment disorder with anxious mood: controlled study versus placebo. Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology 1997;11(2):127-32.
  2. Hattesohl M, Feistel B, Sievers H, Lehnfeld R, Hegger M, Winterhoff H. Extracts of Valeriana officinalis L. s.l. show anxiolytic and antidepressant effects but neither sedative nor myorelaxant properties. Phytomedicine. 2008;15(1-2):2-15.
  3. Delsignore R, Orlando S, Costi D, Baroni MC, Butturini U. Clinical comparative evaluation of a stabilized valeriana extract and placebo. A Folha Medica 1992;104(5):191-6.
  4. Hadley S, Petry JJ. Valerian. Am Fam Physician 2003;67:1755-8.
  5. Muller SF, Klement S. A combination of valerian and lemon balm is effective in the treatment of restlessness and dyssomnia in children. Phytomedicine 2006;13(6):383-7.
  6. Andreatini R, Sartori VA, Seabra ML, Leite JR. Effect of valepotriates (valerian extract) in generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized placebo-controlled pilot study. Phytother Res 2002;16:650-4.
  7. Kohnen R, Oswald WD. The effects of valerian, propranolol, and their combination on activation, performance, and mood of healthy volunteers under social stress conditions. Pharmacopsychiatry 1988;21:447-8.
  8. Muller D, Pfeil T, von den Driesch V. Treating depression comorbid with anxiety - results of an open, practice-oriented study with St John's wort WSu 5572 and valerian extract in high doses. Phytomedicine 2003;10:25-30.
  9. Cropley M, Cave Z, Ellis J, Middleton RW. Effect of kava and valerian on human physiological and psychological responses to mental stress assessed under laboratory conditions. Phytother Res 2002;16:23-7.

5-HTP is an amino acid derived naturally from the seeds of the plant Griffonia Simplicifolia. Scientific studies show that 5-HTP helps relieve anxiety. As 5-HTP is converted to serotonin naturally by the body. Serotonin has been shown to be vital in the regulation of mood, particularly with problems of anxiety and depression.

*References:
  1. Kahn RS, Westenberg HG, Verhoeven WM, Gispen-de Wied CC, Kamerbeek WD. Effect of a serotonin precursor and uptake inhibitor in anxiety disorders; a double-blind comparison of 5-hydroxytryptophan, clomipramine and placebo. International Clinical Psychopharmacology 1987;2(1):33-45.
  2. Angst J, Woggon B, Schoepf J. The treatment of depression with L-5-Hydroxytryptophan versus imipramine. Results of two open and one double-blind study. Archiv fuer Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankheiten 1977;224(2):175-86.
  3. Kline N, Sacks W, Simpson G. Further studies on one day treatment of depression with 5-HTP. American Journal of Psychiatry 1964;121:379-81.
  4. Alino J, Gutierrez J, Iglesias M. 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and a MAOI (nialamide) in the treatment of depression. A double blind controlled study. International Pharmacopsychiatry 1976;11(1):8-15.
  5. Meltzer H, Perline R, Tricou B, Loewe M, Robertson A. Effect of 5-Hydroxytryptophan on serum cortisol levels in major affective disorders II Relation to suicide. Archives of General Psychiatry 1984;41(4):379-87.
  6. Jorm AF, Christensen H, Griffiths KM, Parslow RA. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. Med J Aust 2004;181(7 Suppl):S29-46.
  7. Van Praag HM, Korf J. 5-Hydroxytryptophan as antidepressant: The predictive value of the probenecid test. Psychopharmacology Bulletin 1972;8(4):34-5.
  8. Schruers K, van Diest R, Overbeek T, Griez E. Acute L-5-hydroxytryptophan administration inhibits carbon dioxide-induced panic in panic disorder patients. Psychiatry Res 2002;113(3):237-43.
  9. Shaw K, Turner J, Del Mar C. Tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan for depression. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(1):CD003198.

L-theanine is a well-known amino acid often found in green tea. Several recent scientific studies show that L-theanine has a calming effect on the body and relieves physical signs of stress and anxiety, like sweaty palms and rapid heart rate. It also has been shown to ease psychological stress, with patients reporting a generalized 'calmer feeling' after its use.

*References:
  1. Rogers PJ, Smith JE, Heatherley SV, Pleydell-Pearce CW. Time for tea: mood, blood pressure and cognitive performance effects of caffeine and theanine administered alone and together. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2008;195(4):569-77.
  2. Kakuda T, Nozawa A, Unno T, et al. Inhibiting effects of theanine on caffeine stimulation evaluated by EEG in the rat. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2000;64:287-293.
  3. Kimura, K, M Ozeki, LR Juneja, H Ohira L-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses Biological Psychology 2007;74(1):39-45.
  4. L-theanine . Monograph. Altern Med Rev 2005;10(2):136-8.
  5. Yokogoshi H, Kato Y, Sagesaka YM, et al. Reduction effect of theanine on blood pressure and brain 5-hydroxyindoles in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem1995;59:615-8.
  6. Lu K, Gray MA, Oliver C, Liley DT, Harrison BJ, Bartholomeusz CF, Phan KL, Nathan PJ. The acute effects of L-theanine in comparison with alprazolam on anticipatory anxiety in humans. Hum Psychopharmacol 2004;19(7):457-65.
  7. Juneja, LR, DC Chu, T Okubo, Y Nagato, H Yokogoshi L-theanine-a unique amino acid of green tea and its relaxation effect in humans. Trends in Food Science & Technology 1999;10(6-7):199-204.
  8. Yokogoshi H, Kobayashi M, Mochizuki M, Terashima T. Effect of theanine, rglutamylethylamide, on brain monoamines and striatal dopamine release in conscious rats. Neurochem Res 1998;23:667-73.
  9. Ito K, Nagato Y, Aoi N, et al. Effects of L-theanine on the release of alpha-brain waves in human volunteers. Nippon Nogeikagaku Kaishi 1998;72:153-157.

Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata) is well known for combating insomnia and anxiety. Passiflora incarnata is one of a group of plants classified as "serotonin-derived" due to their chemical composition. Clinical studies indicate that the chemical components found in passion flower are effective at regulating the uptake of 5-HTP in the brain and therefore play a significant role in relieving anxiety.

*References:
  1. Krenn L. Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata L.)--a reliable herbal sedative. Wien Med Wochenschr 2002;152(15-16):404-6.
  2. Bourin M, Bougerol T, Guitton B, Broutin E. A combination of plant extracts in the treatment of outpatients with adjustment disorder with anxious mood: controlled study versus placebo. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology 1997;11(2):127-32.
  3. Movafegh A, Alizadeh R, Hajimohamadi F, Esfehani F, Nejatfar M. Preoperative oral Passiflora incarnata reduces anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Anesth Analg 2008;106(6):1728-32.
  4. Barbosa PR, Valvassori SS, Bordignon CL Jr, Kappel VD, Martins MR, Gavioli EC, Quevedo J, Reginatto FH. The aqueous extracts of Passiflora alata and Passiflora edulis reduce anxiety-related behaviors without affecting memory process in rats. J Med Food 2008;11(2):282-8.
  5. Dhawan K, Kumar S, Sharma A. Anti-anxiety studies on extracts of Passiflora incarnata Linneaus. J Ethnopharmacol 2001;78(2-3):165-70.
  6. Brown E, Hurd NS, McCall S, Ceremuga TE. Evaluation of the anxiolytic effects of chrysin, a Passiflora incarnata extract, in the laboratory rat. AANA J 2007;75(5):333-7.
  7. Dhawan K, Dhawan S, Chhabra S. Attenuation of benzodiazepine dependence in mice by a tri-substituted benzoflavone moiety of Passiflora incarnata Linneaus: a non-habit forming anxiolytic. J Pharm Pharm Sci 2003;6(2):215-22.
  8. Akhondzadeh S, Naghavi HR, Vazirian M, Shayeganpour A, Rashidi H, Khani M. Passionflower in the treatment of generalized anxiety: a pilot double-blind randomized controlled trial with oxazepam. Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics 2002;26(5):363-7.
  9. Dhawan K, Kumar S, Sharma A. Anxiolytic activity of aerial and underground parts of Passiflora incarnata. Fitoterapia 2001;72(8):922-6.
  10. Ernst E. Herbal remedies for anxiety - a systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Phytomedicine 2006;13(3):205-8.
  11. Miyasaka LS, Atallah AN, Soares BG. Passiflora for anxiety disorder. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007;(1):CD004518.
  12. Mori A, Hasegawa K, Murasaki M, Yamauchi T, et al.Clinical Evaluation of Passiflamin (passiflora extract) on neurosis - multicenter double blind study in comparison with mexazolam. Clinical Evaluation 1993;21:383-440.

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) has been used historically as a calming agent for many years. Chamomile contains several active chemical compounds shown clinically to have mild anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects. This ancient remedy for anxiety still works, relaxing the nervous system, relaxing the muscles and easing the digestive complaints that often accompany anxiety.

*References:
  1. Sarris, J; Panossian, A; Schweitzer, I; Stough, C; Scholey, A (December 2011). "Herbal medicine for depression, anxiety, and insomnia: a review of psychopharmacology and clinical evidence". European neuropsychopharmacology 21 (12): 841–860.
  2. McKay, Diane L., Jeffrey B. Blumberg A Review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of chamomile tea (Matricaria recutita L.) Phytotherapy Research 2006;20(7):519-30.
  3. Kakuta, H., Yano-Kakuta, E. and Moriya, K. Psyxhological and physiological effects in humans of eating chamomile jelly. Acta Hort (ISHS) 2007;749:187-92.
  4. Awad R, Levac D, Cybulska P, Merali Z, Trudeau VL, Arnason JT. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 2007;85(9):933-42.

Bacopa Monniera (Brahmi) is a small flowering plant traditionally used throughout India for the treatment of a variety of ailments. Brahmi has been shown in recent studies to have anti-anxiety effects. The relief of anxiety symptoms is thought to be caused by the active chemical interaction with the GABA system in the brain, which has been shown to be related to anxiety disorders. It has the positive effect of enhancing memory and cognitive functions also.

*References:
  1. Ernst, E. Herbal remedies for anxiety - a systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Phytomedicine 2006;13(3):205-208.
  2. Calabrese C, Gregory WL, Leo M, Kraemer D, Bone K, Oken B. Effects of a standardized Bacopa monnieri extract on cognitive performance, anxiety, and depression in the elderly: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2008;14(6):707-13.

Magnolia (Magnolia officinalis) is used as a general anti-stress and anti-anxiety agent providing a range of general benefits for restoring calm and reducing stress. Magnolia bark contains bioactive ingredients such as magnolol and honokiol which activate nuclear receptors and is also said to contain anti-depressant, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects.

*References:
  1. Han H., Jung J.K., Han S.B., Nam S.Y., Oh K.W., Hong J.T. (2011). "Anxiolytic-like effects of 4-O-methylhonokiol isolated from magnolia officinalis through enhancement of GABAergic transmission and chloride influx". Journal of Medicinal Food 14 (7–8): 724–731. doi:10.1089/jmf.2010.1111. PMID 21501091.
  2. Kalman D.S., Feldman S., Feldman R., Schwartz H.I., Krieger D.R., Garrison R. (2008). "Effect of a proprietary Magnolia and Phellodendron extract on stress levels in healthy women: A pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial". Nutrition Journal 7 (1): 11. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-7-11.
  3. Ma L., Chen J., Wang X., Liang X., Luo Y., Zhu W., Wang T., Peng M., Li S., Jie S., Peng A., Wei Y., Chen L. (2011). "Structural modification of honokiol, a biphenyl occurring in magnolia officinalis: The evaluation of honokiol analogues as inhibitors of angiogenesis and for their cytotoxicity and structure-activity relationship". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 54 (19): 6469–6481. doi:10.1021/jm200830u. PMID 21853991.
  4. Fried L.E., Arbiser J.L. (2009). "Honokiol, a multifunctional antiangiogenic and antitumor agent". Antioxidants and Redox Signaling 11 (5): 1139–1148. doi:10.1089/ars.2009.2440. PMC 2842137. PMID 19203212.
  5. Hu J., Chen L.-J., Liu L., Chen X., Chen P., Yang G.-L., Hou W.-L., Tang M.-H., Zhang F., Wang X.-H., Zhao X., Wei Y.-Q. (2008). "Liposomal honokiol, a potent anti-angiogenesis agent, in combination with radiotherapy produces a synergistic antitumor efficacy without increasing toxicity". Experimental & Molecular Medicine 40 (6): 617–628. doi:10.3858/emm.2008.40.6.617. PMC 2679338. PMID 19116447.
  6. Lee YJ, Lee YM, Lee CK, Jung JK, Han SB, Hong JT (2011). "Therapeutic applications of compounds in the Magnolia family". Pharmacol Ther. 130 (2): 157–176. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2011.01.010. PMID 21277893.
  7. Atanasov AG, Wang JN, Gu SP, Bu J, Kramer MP, Baumgartner L, Fakhrudin N, Ladurner A, Malainer C, Vuorinen A, Noha SM, Schwaiger S, Rollinger JM, Schuster D, Stuppner H, Dirsch VM, Heiss EH. (October 2013). "Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature." 1830 (10). pp. 4813–9. doi:10.1016/j.bbagen.2013.06.021. PMC 3790966. PMID 23811337.

Eleuthero root was originally introduced from Russia (and formerly known as Siberian Ginseng), Eleuthero is one of the best adaptogenic herbs available. It is used for enhancing resistance to diseases, increasing physical performance and stamina, strengthening the immune system, reducing anxiety, and promoting clearer thinking.

*References:
  1. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredie...
  2. Bone K, Mill S, eds. Principles and Practices of Phytotherapy, Modern Herbal Medicine. London: Churchill Livingstone; 2000.

Oats (Avena Sativa) have long been used for alleviating fatigue and for restoring strength and vigor. They are balancing and calming to the nervous system and encourage healthier sleep patterns. Traditionally oats have been valued for their antidepressant and nerve regenerative properties. As a porridge, Oats provide a nutritious meal and is a good source of B vitamins (calming to the nervous system) and contain healthy soluble fiber which can lower cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar levels to prevent changes in mood levels that can trigger anxiety, irritability and symptoms of depression. Oats promote the neurochemical serotonin in the brain which in turn calms the brain and body relieving feelings of anxiety, nervousness and sleep related problems.

*References:
  1. Oats". World's Healthiest Foods, The George Mateljan Foundation. 2014.
  2. Whitehead A, Beck EJ, Tosh S, Wolever TM (2014). "Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials". Am J Clin Nutr 100 (6): 1413–21.
  3. James A. Duke, Handbook of medicinal herbs, CRC Press, 2002.

Magnesium is a key nutrient in the treatment of anxiety. Studies indicate that anxiety may be due in part to low magnesium levels. Also, there is evidence to suggest that stress levels can affect magnesium levels within the body during periods of extreme stress.

*References:
  1. Spasov AA, Iezhitsa IN, Kharitonova MV, Kravchenko MS. Depression-like and anxiety-related behaviour of rats fed with magnesium-deficient diet. Zh Vyssh Nerv Deiat Im I P Pavlova 2008;58(4):476-85.
  2. Jacka FN, Overland S, Stewart R, Tell GS, Bjelland I, Mykletun A. Association between magnesium intake and depression and anxiety in community-dwelling adults: the Hordaland Health Study. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2009;43(1):45-52.
  3. Fromm L, Heath DL, Vink R, Nimmo AJ. Magnesium attenuates post-traumatic depression/anxiety following diffuse traumatic brain injury in rats. J Am Coll Nutr 2004;23(5):529S-533S.
  4. Recarte Garcua Andrade C, del Castillo Rueda A, Torres Segovia F. Anxiolytic effect of magnesium. An Med Interna 1991;8(11):576.
  5. Hanus M, Lafon J, Mathieu M. Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a fixed combination containing two plant extracts (Crataegus oxyacantha and Eschscholtzia californica) and magnesium in mild-to-moderate anxiety disorders. Curr Med Res Opin 2004;20(1):63-71.
  6. Grases G, Purez-Castellu JA, Sanchis P, Casero A, Perellu J, Isern B, Rigo E, Grases F. Anxiety and stress among science students. Study of calcium and magnesium alterations. Magnes Res 2006;19(2):102-6.
  7. De Souza MC, Walker AF, Robinson PA, Bolland K. A synergistic effect of a daily supplement for 1 month of 200 mg magnesium plus 50 mg vitamin B6 for the relief of anxiety-related premenstrual symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. J Womens Health Gend Based Med 2000;9(2):131-9.
  8. Poleszak E, Szewczyk B, Kedzierska E, Wla? P, Pilc A, Nowak G. Antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity of magnesium in mice. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2004;78(1):7-12.
  9. Seelig MS. Consequences of magnesium deficiency on the enhancement of stress reactions; preventive and therapeutic implications (a review). J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13(5):429-46.

Niacinamide is a form of niacin that has anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties. Unlike regular niacin, however, niacinamide (unlike Niacin) does not cause flushing or stress to the liver. Niacinamide is a water-soluble vitamin from the B group of vitamins that has anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties and may work similar to psychoactive medication such as Benzodiazepine.

*References:
  1. Tallman JF, Paul SM, Skolnick P, Gallager DW (1980). "Receptors for the age of anxiety: pharmacology of the benzodiazepines". Science 207 (4428): 274–81.
  2. Paul, SM; Marangos, PJ; Skolnick, P; Goodwin, FK (1982). "Biological substrates of anxiety: benzodiazepine receptors and endogenous ligands.". L'Encephale 8 (2): 131–44.
  3. Akhundov, RA; Sultanov, AA; Gadzhily, RA; Sadykhov, RV (May 1993). "[Psychoregulating role of nicotinamide].". Biulleten' eksperimental'noi biologii i meditsiny 115 (5): 487–91.


AnxiClear's™ Night Formula - Proprietary Blend of Ingredients:

Click here to see our label.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) extract is a safe and effective natural sedative, that calms both the mind and body due to its anxiolytic properties. Clinical research demonstrates that Valerian effectively relieves anxiety-related insomnia and suggests that it may actually be comparable to some prescription anti-anxiety drugs for treating anxiety disorders. Unlike many drugs, however, Valerian is not addictive or habit-forming when taken in the recommended dose and has no known side effects. It is believed to work to have an affect on the brain's GABA system (a major inhibitory neurotransmitter), boosting GABA levels to promote relaxation and lower stress levels.

*References:
  1. Bourin M, Bougerol T, Guitton B, Broutin E. A combination of plant extracts in the treatment of outpatients with adjustment disorder with anxious mood: controlled study versus placebo. Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology 1997;11(2):127-32.
  2. Hattesohl M, Feistel B, Sievers H, Lehnfeld R, Hegger M, Winterhoff H. Extracts of Valeriana officinalis L. s.l. show anxiolytic and antidepressant effects but neither sedative nor myorelaxant properties. Phytomedicine. 2008;15(1-2):2-15.
  3. Delsignore R, Orlando S, Costi D, Baroni MC, Butturini U. Clinical comparative evaluation of a stabilized valeriana extract and placebo. A Folha Medica 1992;104(5):191-6.
  4. Hadley S, Petry JJ. Valerian. Am Fam Physician 2003;67:1755-8.
  5. Muller SF, Klement S. A combination of valerian and lemon balm is effective in the treatment of restlessness and dyssomnia in children. Phytomedicine 2006;13(6):383-7.
  6. Andreatini R, Sartori VA, Seabra ML, Leite JR. Effect of valepotriates (valerian extract) in generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized placebo-controlled pilot study. Phytother Res 2002;16:650-4.
  7. Kohnen R, Oswald WD. The effects of valerian, propranolol, and their combination on activation, performance, and mood of healthy volunteers under social stress conditions. Pharmacopsychiatry 1988;21:447-8.
  8. Muller D, Pfeil T, von den Driesch V. Treating depression comorbid with anxiety - results of an open, practice-oriented study with St John's wort WSu 5572 and valerian extract in high doses. Phytomedicine 2003;10:25-30.
  9. Cropley M, Cave Z, Ellis J, Middleton RW. Effect of kava and valerian on human physiological and psychological responses to mental stress assessed under laboratory conditions. Phytother Res 2002;16:23-7.

Passion Flower is well known for combating insomnia and anxiety. Passiflora incarnata is one of a group of plants classified as "serotonin-derived" due to their chemical composition. Clinical studies indicate that the chemical components found in passion flower are effective at regulating the uptake of 5-HTP in the brain and therefore play a significant role in relieving anxiety.

*References:
  1. Krenn L. Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata L.)--a reliable herbal sedative. Wien Med Wochenschr 2002;152(15-16):404-6.
  2. Bourin M, Bougerol T, Guitton B, Broutin E. A combination of plant extracts in the treatment of outpatients with adjustment disorder with anxious mood: controlled study versus placebo. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology 1997;11(2):127-32.
  3. Movafegh A, Alizadeh R, Hajimohamadi F, Esfehani F, Nejatfar M. Preoperative oral Passiflora incarnata reduces anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Anesth Analg 2008;106(6):1728-32.
  4. Barbosa PR, Valvassori SS, Bordignon CL Jr, Kappel VD, Martins MR, Gavioli EC, Quevedo J, Reginatto FH. The aqueous extracts of Passiflora alata and Passiflora edulis reduce anxiety-related behaviors without affecting memory process in rats. J Med Food 2008;11(2):282-8.
  5. Dhawan K, Kumar S, Sharma A. Anti-anxiety studies on extracts of Passiflora incarnata Linneaus. J Ethnopharmacol 2001;78(2-3):165-70.
  6. Brown E, Hurd NS, McCall S, Ceremuga TE. Evaluation of the anxiolytic effects of chrysin, a Passiflora incarnata extract, in the laboratory rat. AANA J 2007;75(5):333-7.
  7. Dhawan K, Dhawan S, Chhabra S. Attenuation of benzodiazepine dependence in mice by a tri-substituted benzoflavone moiety of Passiflora incarnata Linneaus: a non-habit forming anxiolytic. J Pharm Pharm Sci 2003;6(2):215-22.
  8. Akhondzadeh S, Naghavi HR, Vazirian M, Shayeganpour A, Rashidi H, Khani M. Passionflower in the treatment of generalized anxiety: a pilot double-blind randomized controlled trial with oxazepam. Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics 2002;26(5):363-7.
  9. Dhawan K, Kumar S, Sharma A. Anxiolytic activity of aerial and underground parts of Passiflora incarnata. Fitoterapia 2001;72(8):922-6.
  10. Ernst E. Herbal remedies for anxiety - a systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Phytomedicine 2006;13(3):205-8.
  11. Miyasaka LS, Atallah AN, Soares BG. Passiflora for anxiety disorder. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007;(1):CD004518.
  12. Mori A, Hasegawa K, Murasaki M, Yamauchi T, et al.Clinical Evaluation of Passiflamin (passiflora extract) on neurosis - multicenter double blind study in comparison with mexazolam. Clinical Evaluation 1993;21:383-440.

Chamomile (Matricaria Recutita L.) has been used historically as a calming agent for many years. Chamomile contains several active chemical compounds shown clinically to have mild anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects. This ancient remedy for anxiety still works, relaxing the nervous system, relaxing the muscles and easing the digestive complaints that often accompany anxiety.

*References:
  1. McKay, Diane L., Jeffrey B. Blumberg A Review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of chamomile tea (Matricaria recutita L.) Phytotherapy Research 2006;20(7):519-30.
  2. Kakuta, H., Yano-Kakuta, E. and Moriya, K. Psyxhological and physiological effects in humans of eating chamomile jelly. Acta Hort (ISHS) 2007;749:187-92.
  3. Awad R, Levac D, Cybulska P, Merali Z, Trudeau VL, Arnason JT. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 2007;85(9):933-42.

Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis) has been shown in several placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials to demonstrate that combinations of Valerian and Lemon Balm extracts effectively promote sleep. The German Commission E has approved Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) for the relief of sleep disturbances. When combined with Valerian, Lemon Balm may be especially effective at quickening sleep onset and improving the quality of sleep. In fact, one clinical trial found a combination of Lemon Balm and Valerian to be just as effective as some prescription sleep medication. Furthermore, it has been shown to be especially effective at quickening sleep onset and improving the quality of sleep.

*References:
  1. Dressing H, Riemann D, Low H, et al. Insomnia: Are valerian/balm combination of equal value to benzodiazepine? Therapiewoche 1992;42:726-36 [in German].
  2. Dressing H, Kohler S, Muller WE. Improvement of sleep quality with a high-dose valerian/lemon balm preparation: A placebo-controlled double-blind study. Psychopharmakotherapie 1996;6:32-40.
  3. Cerny A, Schmid K. Tolerability and efficacy of valerian/lemon balm in healthy volunteers (a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study). Fitoterapia 1999;70:221-8.
  4. Kennedy, D. O.; Little, W; Scholey, AB (2004). "Attenuation of Laboratory-Induced Stress in Humans After Acute Administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm)". Psychosomatic Medicine 66 (4): 607–13.
  5. Awad, Rosalie; Muhammad, Asim; Durst, Tony; Trudeau, Vance L.; Arnason, John T. (2009). "Bioassay-guided fractionation of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) using an in vitro measure of GABA transaminase activity". Phytotherapy Research 23 (8): 1075–81.

Hops (Humulus lupulus) are the flowers of the Humulus lupulus plant, and have been uses for centuries for their sedative properties. They are recognized for their positive support for sleep difficulties, feelings of anxiety, inability to rest, nervousness and stress to balance calm and restore peace.

*References:
  1. Plants for a Future: Humulus lupulus Plants for a Future. Retrieved 4 September 2012.
  2. Franco L, Sánchez C, Bravo R, Rodriguez A, Barriga C, Juánez JC; Sánchez; Bravo; Rodriguez; Barriga; Juánez (June 2012). "The sedative effects of hops (Humulus lupulus), a component of beer, on the activity/rest rhythm". Acta Physiologica Hungarica 99 (2): 133–9.
  3. Franco L, Sánchez C, Bravo R, Rodríguez AB, Barriga C, Romero E, Cubero J (2012). "The sedative effect of non-alcoholic beer in healthy female nurses". PLoS One 7 (7): e37290.

Taurine is a naturally occurring organic sulfonic acid found in the body and is essential for many functions including cardiovascular, skeletal development and for the central nervous system. Its range of therapeutic benefits include anxiolytic effects which are thought to act as a regulator or anti-anxiety element in the central nervous system by activating the glycine receptor, lowering blood pressure and calming the sympathetic nervous system.

*References:
  1. Green, TR; Fellman, JH; Eicher, AL; Pratt, KL (1991). "Antioxidant role and subcellular location of hypotaurine and taurine in human neutrophils". Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1073 (1): 91–7.
  2. Gürer, H; Ozgünes, H; Saygin, E; Ercal, N (2001). "Antioxidant effect of taurine against lead-induced oxidative stress". Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 41 (4): 397–402.
  3. Das, J; Ghosh, J; Manna, P; Sil, PC (2008). "Taurine provides antioxidant defense against NaF-induced cytotoxicity in murine hepatocytes". Pathophysiology 15 (3): 181–90.
  4. Sinha, M; Manna, P; Sil, PC (2008). "Taurine protects the antioxidant defense system in the erythrocytes of cadmium treated mice". BMB Reports 41 (9): 657–63.

Magnolia Bark (Magnolia officinalis) is used as a general anti-stress and anti-anxiety agent providing a range of general benefits for restoring calm and reducing stress. Magnolia bark contains bioactive ingredients such as magnolol and honokiol which activate nuclear receptors and is also said to contain anti-depressant, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects.

*References:
  1. Han H., Jung J.K., Han S.B., Nam S.Y., Oh K.W., Hong J.T. (2011). "Anxiolytic-like effects of 4-O-methylhonokiol isolated from magnolia officinalis through enhancement of GABAergic transmission and chloride influx". Journal of Medicinal Food 14 (7–8): 724–731. doi:10.1089/jmf.2010.1111. PMID 21501091.
  2. Kalman D.S., Feldman S., Feldman R., Schwartz H.I., Krieger D.R., Garrison R. (2008). "Effect of a proprietary Magnolia and Phellodendron extract on stress levels in healthy women: A pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial". Nutrition Journal 7 (1): 11. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-7-11.
  3. Ma L., Chen J., Wang X., Liang X., Luo Y., Zhu W., Wang T., Peng M., Li S., Jie S., Peng A., Wei Y., Chen L. (2011). "Structural modification of honokiol, a biphenyl occurring in magnolia officinalis: The evaluation of honokiol analogues as inhibitors of angiogenesis and for their cytotoxicity and structure-activity relationship". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 54 (19): 6469–6481. doi:10.1021/jm200830u. PMID 21853991.
  4. Fried L.E., Arbiser J.L. (2009). "Honokiol, a multifunctional antiangiogenic and antitumor agent". Antioxidants and Redox Signaling 11 (5): 1139–1148. doi:10.1089/ars.2009.2440. PMC 2842137. PMID 19203212.
  5. Hu J., Chen L.-J., Liu L., Chen X., Chen P., Yang G.-L., Hou W.-L., Tang M.-H., Zhang F., Wang X.-H., Zhao X., Wei Y.-Q. (2008). "Liposomal honokiol, a potent anti-angiogenesis agent, in combination with radiotherapy produces a synergistic antitumor efficacy without increasing toxicity". Experimental & Molecular Medicine 40 (6): 617–628. doi:10.3858/emm.2008.40.6.617. PMC 2679338. PMID 19116447.
  6. Lee YJ, Lee YM, Lee CK, Jung JK, Han SB, Hong JT (2011). "Therapeutic applications of compounds in the Magnolia family". Pharmacol Ther. 130 (2): 157–176. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2011.01.010. PMID 21277893.
  7. Atanasov AG, Wang JN, Gu SP, Bu J, Kramer MP, Baumgartner L, Fakhrudin N, Ladurner A, Malainer C, Vuorinen A, Noha SM, Schwaiger S, Rollinger JM, Schuster D, Stuppner H, Dirsch VM, Heiss EH. (October 2013). "Honokiol: A non-adipogenic PPARγ agonist from nature." 1830 (10). pp. 4813–9. doi:10.1016/j.bbagen.2013.06.021. PMC 3790966. PMID 23811337.

Jujube Seed (Ziziphus jujuba) has been popular in Chinese medicine for thousands of years, used as a sedative for treating insomnia and anxiety. It contains natural anti-oxidants, anxiolytic, anti-fungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and sedative qualities. The key chemical found in jujubes is jujuboside A, which works to affect the hippocampus, providing relief from insomnia, anxiety and stress.

*References:
  1. Mill Goetz P. "Demonstration of the psychotropic effect of mother tincture of Zizyphus jujuba" Phytotherapie 2009 7:1 (31-36).
  2. Jiang J.-G., Huang X.-J., Chen J., Lin Q.-S.,"Comparison of the sedative and hypnotic effects of flavonoids, saponins, and polysaccharides extracted from Semen Ziziphus jujube", Natural Product Research 2007 21:4 (310-320).
  3. Mahajan R.T., Chopda M.Z. "Phyto-pharmacology of Ziziphus jujuba mill - A plant review" Mahajan R.T., Chopda M.Z. Pharmacognosy Reviews 2009 3:6 (320–329).

Reishi Mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum) is considered, in parts of the world, an incredible herb to boost longevity and due to its adaptogenic, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties it has also been shown, among many other benefits, to be calming on the nervous system. Containing polysaccharides, which stimulate the immune system and triterpene acids which reduce hypertension, it is commonly used to relieve insomnia and anxiety.

*References:
  1. Jin X, Ruiz Beguerie J, Sze DMY, Chan GCF. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) for cancer treatment. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD007731
  2. https://healingreishi.wordpress.com/reishi-other-remedies-for-insomnia/
  3. Dinesh, P. Babu and Subhasree, R.S. (2008). The Sacred Mushroom "Reishi" - a Review. American - Eurasian Journal of Botany, 1 (3): 107-110.

Melatonin is a natural human hormone that works with the body's own sleep-wake cycle (circadian rhythm), providing a healthier and more restful sleep than sedative drugs. Levels of melatonin and its production vary throughout our life cycle, these differing levels affect our sleep patterns. Many studies have been conducted showing the benefits of melatonin on treating anxiety and also to promote better sleep, regulate sleep/wake cycles and improve sleep quality providing a healthier, more refreshing sleep than sedative drugs.

*References:
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  2. Attenburrow MEJ, Dowling BA, Sharpley AL, Cowen PJ. Case-control study of evening melatonin concentration in primary insomnia. BMJ 1996;312:1263-4.
  3. Zhdanova IV, Wurtman RJ, Lynch HJ, et al. Sleep-inducing effects of low doses of melatonin ingested in the evening. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1995;57:552-8.
  4. Garfinkel D, Laudon M, Nof D, Zisapel N. Improvement of sleep quality in elderly people by controlled-release melatonin. Lancet 1995;346:541-4.
  5. Haimov I, Laudon M, Zisapel N, Souroujon M, Nof D, Shlitner A, et al. Sleep disorders and melatonin rhythms in elderly people. BMJ 1994;309:167.
  6. Hansen MV, Halladin NL, Rosenberg J, Gögenur I, Møller AM. (2015). "Melatonin for pre- and postoperative anxiety in adults.". Cochrane Database Syst Rev (4): CD009861.
  7. Sack RL, Lewy AJ, Erb DL, Vollmer WM, Singer CM (1986). "Human melatonin production decreases with age". J. Pineal Res. 3 (4): 379–88.
  8. Ardura J, Gutierrez R, Andres J, Agapito T (2003). "Emergence and evolution of the circadian rhythm of melatonin in children". Horm. Res. 59 (2): 66–72